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January 21, 2010 / alunatunes

Meet Trumpet teacher Gary Dusterhoff!


Gary Dusterhoff, a native of Atlanta, Georgia received his first trumpet from his future brother in law at age eleven. A King “silver Flair” Bb trumpet was an expensive horn to hand over to a kid in 1972. This cherished horn was at gary’s side wherever he went for the next decade. Performing as soloist in front of the entire student body after only one year of study, Gary had his first brush with stage fright. This common ailment has, among other things, became a subject of much interest along a thirty five year road to musicianship. Attending university music departments at Jacksonville State University, University of Georgia and Georgia State University gave “Dusty”(as he is called by friends and students) a unique insight into study. He carefully noted the variety of teaching techniques and methods used by such teachers as: Albert Ligotti at UGA, Larry Black of ASO, Jon Merriman and Fred Grummley at JSU, Peter Hennes at GSU and Jerry Bird of The Freddie Cole Trio. “Music instruction can greatly aid student musicians by eliminating years of wasted time otherwise spent focusing on the wrong things.” Gary believes that a simple assessment taken by an observant educator can bring out the maximum musicianship in any individual at any level of proficiency. Taking the most effective
strategies from his teachers, Mr. Dusterhoff has himself become an insightful coach. Passionate about attending live performances as well as building his collection of vinyl, taped and digital recordings, Dusty encourages his students to listen to music daily. “Immersing oneself in sound can help an individual develop much more quickly.”After years of performing with various ensembles including The Spirit of Atlanta Drum and Bugle Corps, EmoryWind Ensemble, The Redcoat Band and other university organizations, Gary has expanded his influence by studying instruments outside the brass wind family. “I have always enjoyed sounds made from a variety of instruments. When I started listening to Jeff Beck, Mike Stern and Return to Forever, I had to buy an electric guitar and dive in. ”Applying the same work ethic to other instruments has caused Gary’s opinion to be sought after by other accomplished musicians and students from a variety of backgrounds. “It is the highest compliment to be paid when a fellow player or composer asks me for my take on their work.” Mr. Dusterhoff believes that a methodical course of study is essential but that the fires of creativity must be ignited and fanned. “The leaps forward in the technology related to applied music now make it possible to learn faster and have more fun doing it! Very young students can now be exposed to simulated performance experiences as well as other technologies that enhance their learning and appreciation for music greatly.”
 

Gary Dusterhoff, a native of Atlanta, Georgia received his first trumpet from his future brother in law at age eleven. A King “silver Flair” Bb trumpet was an expensive horn to hand over to a kid in 1972. This cherished horn was at gary’s side wherever he went for the next decade. Performing as soloist in front of the entire student body after only one year of study, Gary had his first brush with stage fright. This common ailment has, among other things, became a subject of much interest along a thirty five year road to musicianship. Attending university music departments at Jacksonville State University, University of Georgia and Georgia State University gave “Dusty”(as he is called by friends and students) a unique insight into study. He carefully noted the variety of teaching techniques and methods used by such teachers as: Albert Ligotti at UGA, Larry Black of ASO, Jon Merriman and Fred Grummley at JSU, Peter Hennes at GSU and Jerry Bird of The Freddie Cole Trio. “Music instruction can greatly aid student musicians by eliminating years of wasted time otherwise spent focusing on the wrong things.” Gary believes that a simple assessment taken by an observant educator can bring out the maximum musicianship in any individual at any level of proficiency. Taking the most effective

strategies from his teachers, Mr. Dusterhoff has himself become an insightful coach. Passionate about attending live performances as well as building his collection of vinyl, taped and digital recordings, Dusty encourages his students to listen to music daily. “Immersing oneself in sound can help an individual develop much more quickly.”After years of performing with various ensembles including The Spirit of Atlanta Drum and Bugle Corps, EmoryWind Ensemble, The Redcoat Band and other university organizations, Gary has expanded his influence by studying instruments outside the brass wind family. “I have always enjoyed sounds made from a variety of instruments. When I started listening to Jeff Beck, Mike Stern and Return to Forever, I had to buy an electric guitar and dive in. ”Applying the same work ethic to other instruments has caused Gary’s opinion to be sought after by other accomplished musicians and students from a variety of backgrounds. “It is the highest compliment to be paid when a fellow player or composer asks me for my take on their work.” Mr. Dusterhoff believes that a methodical course of study is essential but that the fires of creativity must be ignited and fanned. “The leaps forward in the technology related to applied music now make it possible to learn faster and have more fun doing it! Very young students can now be exposed to simulated performance experiences as well as other technologies that enhance their learning and appreciation for music greatly.”
 
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